Medical News

  • New IR treatment for 'tennis elbow' reduces pain and inflammation without surgery
    Tennis elbow, the painful chronic condition that affects up to 3 percent of the U.S. adult population, can be effectively treated through transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE), an image-guided, non-surgical treatment that decreases abnormal blood flow to the injured area to reduce inflammation and pain, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. The condition, also known as lateral epicondylitis, stems from repetitive stress injuries that occur in activities such as sports, typing and knitting, and the injury is common in carpenters, cooks and assembly line workers impacting basic tasks that affect job performance and quality of life. Read more »
  • Smart speaker technology harnessed for hospital medical treatments
    Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. Smart speakers, such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home, offer a conversational voice interface that allows interventional radiology (IR) physicians to ask questions and retrieve information needed for their patient treatments without breaking sterile scrub. Read more »
  • Fathers-to-be: smoking could harm your baby
    Fathers-to-be who smoke may increase the risk of congenital heart defects in their offspring, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). For mothers-to-be, both smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke were detrimental. Read more »
  • In healthy young women, sleep quality varies throughout the menstrual cycle
    Young women are more likely to experience sleep disruption in the days leading up to their menstrual period, according to a new study that will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Breast cancer may be likelier to spread to bone with nighttime dim-light exposure
    Exposure to dim light at night, which is common in today's lifestyle, may contribute to the spread of breast cancer to the bones, researchers have shown for the first time in an animal study. Results of the study will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Older adults with type 1 diabetes often not aware of hypoglycemia
    Older adults with type 1 diabetes typically have low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, for more than an hour a day, suggests research to be presented Monday, March 25 at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Race, ethnicity influence fracture risk in people with diabetes
    Caucasians and Hispanics with diabetes have a greater risk of fracture compared to those without diabetes, while African Americans with diabetes have little to no additional fracture risk, according to a study to be presented Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • A1c test misses many cases of diabetes
    Using the hemoglobin A1c blood test to diagnose diabetes tends to underestimate the prevalence of the disease, according to a new study to be presented Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Another possible consequence of the opioid epidemic: hormone deficiencies
    Many people who use opioid medications long term do not produce enough testosterone or another important hormone, cortisol, according to a new study. Results of what the researchers called "the most up-to-date and most comprehensive clinical review of endocrine effects of long-term opioid use" are being presented Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Improved PCOS symptoms correlate with gut bacterial composition
    Symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) improved with exposure to healthy bacteria in the gut, according to a study in a mouse model of this common women's endocrine disorder. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Levothyroxine treatment in women with thyroid antibodies may not increase live birth rate
    Treating women with thyroid antibodies but a normal thyroid function with a medicine called Levothyroxine does not make them more likely to deliver a live baby, new research led by the University of Birmingham suggests. Read more »
  • For migraine sufferers with obesity, losing weight can decrease headaches
    For migraine sufferers with obesity, losing weight can decrease headaches and improve quality of life, researchers from Italy and the United States report. The results of their meta-analysis will be presented Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Obesity may play role in reproductive problems in women with type 1 diabetes
    Obesity may play a role in reproductive problems in women with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study to be presented Saturday, March 23 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • New hybrid closed loop insulin pump proves hard to use for some patients with diabetes
    Among first-time users of a new insulin pump that automatically delivers insulin to people with type 1 diabetes, nearly one-fifth stopped using the device, primarily because of difficulties meeting the technical demands system, researchers say. Results of a real-world study of the hybrid closed loop insulin pump (Medtronic MiniMed 670G) will be presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Sperm DNA damage may contribute to repeat miscarriages
    Some cases of recurrent pregnancy loss may be caused by sperm DNA damage in the male partner, rather than by a problem in affected women, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Bisphosphonates increasingly prescribed to the women most likely to benefit
    In recent years, women who start taking bisphosphonates (BPs) to treat osteoporosis and prevent fracture have trended from younger to older and from having osteopenia to having osteoporosis, researchers report. The results of the study will be presented on Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Eating later in the day may be associated with obesity
    Eating later in the day may contribute to weight gain, according to a new study to be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • CPAP machine improves weight loss in dieting adults with obesity, sleep apnea
    When trying to lose weight by cutting calories, people who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in addition to obesity can lose more weight if they treat their sleep disorder with an overnight CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure, machine. This finding of a new study will be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Treating diabetes in older adults requires simpler medication regimens, looser glycemic targets
    Simplifying medication regimens and tailoring glycemic targets in older adults with diabetes improves adherence and avoids treatment-related complications, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. The Society debuted the guideline during a press conference on the opening day of ENDO 2019, its annual meeting in New Orleans, La. Read more »
  • Transgender men have functional ovaries after a year of testosterone injections
    The ovaries of transgender men appear to remain functional even after a year of receiving hormonal treatment with testosterone, according to a small Israeli study presented Saturday in the United States. Read more »
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